Saturday Sep 22, 2007

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I GOT MY ROLL BACK biggrin

I got down everything shiny-side up. Only capsized once - front surfing the little wave at the bottom of S-bend, fell out of it and got flipped over - and swam mad

Maybe I like this sport after all ooo aaa
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aadie:

smile

viking:

Yeah, English. Look a ladybird! Or ladybug, if you call it that.

Wednesday Sep 12, 2007

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Monday Jan 01, 2007

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Happy MMVII boiz & grrls kiss
daisy:

God, i don't even know the song you're talking about.

I wish there was some super profound reason for my name, there isn't. I just think it's cute, and that's it.

branden:

HAHAHAHAHA.

On the contrary, I look quite geeky with glasses on..... robot

thats me with glasses

Tuesday Oct 04, 2005

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serendipity:

kiss

branden:

I am indeed off to Australia.... 2 and a half weeks... I will indeed be like eeek ..... and you will get to hear about every second of it smile

Saturday Apr 16, 2005

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serendipity:

Thanks blush

rosalyn:

Thanks, though the Roman character words aren't the problem, they're even defined at the beginning of the text. It's the Chinese sentence fragments without the pinyin that I need help with. Thanks though! smile

Tuesday Feb 15, 2005

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Cover: I.W
Obstacle: XX (Judgement)
Crown: XXI (The World)
Foot: VII.W
Moving from: XIX (The Sun)
Moving into: VII.S
Attitude: K.W
Environment: V.C
Hopes/fears: II (The High Priestess)
Future: 0 (The Fool)

The situation at hand is the awakening of insight (I.W). The querant has already taken his stand (VII.W), but is is aiming for perfect conciousness...
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Monday Feb 14, 2005

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A LECTURE UPON THE SHADOW

Stand still, and I will read to thee
A Lecture, love, in Loves philosophy.

These three houres that we have spent,
Walking here, Two shadowes went
Along with us, which we our selves produc'd;
But, now the Sunne is just above our head,
We doe those shadowes tread;
And to brave clearnesse all things are reduc'd.
So whilst...
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Saturday Feb 12, 2005

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Yay for snow! Should be good skiing tomorrow. Not enough to rescue the downhills though, after the thaw last week - i went up to our local hill yesterday, and it had big patches of dirty yellow ice showing through. Rode for a couple of hours, but i can't say it was fun - having to pick my way down wherever i could find an edge...
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Thursday Jan 13, 2005

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Shitty weather here in Ice Station Oscar. I have hardly left the house all week. Been munching my way through a big bag of pretzels, drinking tea, and streaming BBC Radio history progs. And reading 'Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell' till the wee hours.
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9ine:

...The Greek παίδος (from παίς......

if you are using Alt+Shift in order to change your characters to Greek, press on the "w" key instead of the "s" key when the Greek word ends in "s". The σ is used in the begining or inside the word. Never in the end. blush

9ine:

You are very welcome smile

Sunday Dec 12, 2004

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Wow. First post. Hello everyone and no-one ;whatever:

This is a phrase collage I made from a few months' worth of collected spam a couple of years ago, and which I was reminded of recently. I especially liked the title phrase (from a bulk mail... offering bulk mail services... natch) which I thought had a kind of 'seti@home' feel to it - is there anybody...
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VIEW 3 of 3 COMMENTS
albertine:

I actually omitted to say that the meaning of "cunning" that you talk about is probabily the one that comes from the anglo saxon verb " kunnan", wich means "to know". There's no evidence of the connection, it's just interesting if you think about the meaning, even now we use the word "dog" in a insulting way!!!
And "Kunopis" litterally means "dogs eyes"!!!
thanx for the post anyways, are you interested in etymology????

straif:

I like that - "Dog's eyes!". It sounds like it ought to be a Shakespearean curse wink Fie on you!

My class teacher when I was 7 years old (back in England) was interested in the Roman - Saxon - Danish - Norman history of the district. She taught us how to spot Saxon place names (the -ham suffix meaning 'home') [Chatham, Borham etc]; the -ing suffix meaning something like 'kin' [Braughing = the village of Braugha's people].

Later, although I was reading sciences, the dean (or 'master') of our college was the archaeologist Colin Renfrew, who has worked on tracing the movement of Indo-European people through the development of the modern European languages - I don't remember exactly, but it's something like all but Basque and one other (Welsh perhaps?) can be connected to the same Indo-Aryan root.

I also got to know some Friends of the Western Buddhist Order (FWBO) buddhists, who take Sanskrit names upon ordination. Sanskrit, being about as close as one can get to the notional proto-Indo-Aryan, re-kindled my interest. For example, the Sanskrit go becomes cu in Old English and finally cow in modern English. Interestingly, just east of the region where Mrs Upton was teaching me Saxon place names, 'cow' is still pronounced something like 'cu' (at least among the older, rural, generation: TV is rapidly homogenizing English pronounciation); there is a village near where my mother now lives called Cowlinge - pronounced cu-linj.

I guess I just love words and their connections. Mine is only an amateur interest though - I am no expert! What got you into it?