Wednesday Apr 26, 2006

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VIEW 25 of 63 COMMENTS
rosscaughers:

suck a long jpurnal soo much info and too much for me to take in due to lack of sleep

i have done the phone call to get we are busy what do you want lol i find it funny

some cool pics i look forward to trying to be a good friend to you and such kiss

squee_:

God damn you were awesome. Wish you were still around here.

Wednesday Apr 19, 2006

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ALL I WANTED WAS A FUCKING PEPSI

I DUNNO WHEN I'LL BE BACK FROM THE HOSPITAL.
--------------------------------------------------------

They say they're gonna fix my brain
Alleviate my suffering and my pain
But by the time they fix my head
Mentally I'll be dead

I'm not crazy - institutionalized
You're the one who's crazy - institutionalized
You're driving me crazy - institutionalized

They stuck...
Read More
VIEW 25 of 32 COMMENTS
andrew77uk:

check ma profile biggrin got a couple of flowering piccies for your erotic pleasuressmile

andrew77uk:

ok then smile

i lik Xanippi cause she has serious moxy!..we need more people like this in the world..she's as real as it gets...

From junnie

OMFG I'm so sorry this happened to you!!! That is so not what SG is about! I won't say what bitch needs to be kicked out of SG but she is so fucking horrid!!!!!!! You are crazy beautiful! Stop hurting yourself they are so not worth it! love love love love

Tuesday Apr 11, 2006

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VIEW 4 of 4 COMMENTS
cld:

But i hate myspace frown

mamet:

I agree that some people were being mean to you unfairly, but I hope you don't get yourself zotted over it. I've always thought you were very interesting and liked having you around here. It would be a shame it you weren't here any longer.

XANIPPI you crazier & sexier than a room full of metongue...

I mean what can you say about a gal with a profile pic like that???....eXXXcept for god bless her heart/chest blush blush

you will from this day forth have an entire chapter in my cool bookswink



Love from: your personal 1st nation sensationbiggrin'---hence the redman

Monday Apr 10, 2006

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SPOILERS! (Click to view)
i was supposed to act out henry the eight in finger puppets
instead i'm posting pussy shots obbsseessiveellly....
i made party with the bowl the 8th and zombi all night.



SPOILERS! (Click to view)

dont comment me
dont talke to me
dont give me attention


i can't sleep
and i can't stop crying
i bought enough dope to...
Read More
VIEW 25 of 39 COMMENTS
mnislahi:

kiss

coldandwet:

Im sorry you recieved so much abuse on the boards.. It was harsh and uncalled for and totally against what I think this site should be about. Just wanted to drop in and give you a bit of support/

Saturday Apr 08, 2006

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SPOILERS! (Click to view)

I had to break up my party tonight when someone started treating me disrespectfully.
I would have never done such a thing.
Something has changed in me.
I think its that I need take pride in myself and not expect my friends to stand up for me.

So when this guy started drooling all over my zombi I ordered him into...
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VIEW 27 of 27 COMMENTS
user573925:

Cuddling is awesome...I miss cuddling with people, of course my pillow never breaks my heart...hmmmmm

skutch:

I'm curious what kind of mental disorder it would take to make someone think those kinds of remarks would be appropriate... confused

Saturday Apr 08, 2006

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SPOILERS! (Click to view)

all my girl friends are jealous of me or mother me.

I hate it when guys give me orgasms

the art at first firdays was really lame.
Suicidegirls spoils me with amazing art everyday.
the fire throwers at gallery five was entertaining.
i was high on percs.
I had falling out with friends because i watch them shoot up and they...
Read More
VIEW 3 of 3 COMMENTS
xanippi:

Hulme (like Sinfield) shows how attacks on post-colonial criticism depend upon the selective quotation, misreading, and flattening of arguments, positions and words. Postcolonialists, like cultural materialists, are accused of suggesting that Shakespeare's.

Sinfield protests that 'so far from presenting Shakespeare as "evilly in favor of such exploitation in Henry V," as [Graham] Bradshaw imagines, Dollimore and I chose to work on this play precisely because it seemed to offer an awkward test for the case we wanted to explore, namely that even a text that has been widely regarded as a celebration of monarchical ideology is implicated in ideological contradiction and available to dissident reading'.

In similar vein, Hulme notes that his own work (and that of others) is widely misread and misquoted in order to suggest that postcolonial criticism of The Tempest believes (as Jonathan Bate's book The Genius of Shakespeare puts it)
'"that the play is in fact a text reeking of the discourse of colonialism. The Tempest must bear the blame for the Atlantic slave trade."'

Even Meredith Anne Skura's article "Discourse and the Individual: The Case of Colonialism in The Tempest" (1989), which Hulme regards as sophisticated and valuable, suggests that 'revisionists . . . emphasize the discursive strategies that the play shares with all colonial discourse, and the ways in which The Tempest itself not only displays prejudice but fosters and even "enacts" colonialism by mystifying or justifying Prospero's power over Caliban.'

Hulme points out that it is Skura's formulation--'not only displays prejudice but fosters and even "enacts" colonialism'--which "introduces a which most postcolonial criticism has been scrupulous in avoiding."

xanippi:

Reading list


Ahmed, Aijaz (1992) In Theory, Classes, Nations, Literatures , London, Verso.

American Council of Trustees and Alumni (1996),The Shakespeare File, What American Majors are Really Studying (December 1996), available on http://www.goacta.org/Reports/Shakespeare.pdf

Barker, Francis and Peter Hulme (1985), "'Nymphs and reapers heavily vanish': The Discursive Con-texts of The Tempest", in John Drakakis, ed., Alternative Shakespeares, London: Methuen, pp. 191-205.

Bartels, Bartels (1997), 'Othello and Africa: Postcolonialism Reconsidered', The William and Mary Quarterly, 3d series, Vol. LIV, NO. 1 January 1997, pp. 45-64.

Bate, Jonathan (1997), The Genius of Shakespeare, London: Picador.

Burton, Antoinette (forthcoming), "When was Britain? Nostalgia for the Nation at the End of the 'American Century,'" Journal of Modern History (June 2003).

Dirlik, Arif (1994), 'The Postcolonial Aura, Third World Criticism in the Age of Global Capitalism,' Critical Inquiry 20: 2 (Winter 1994), pp. 328-356.

D'Souza, Dinesh (2002). 'Two Cheers for Colonialism', Chronicle of Higher Education, May 10.

Hamlin, William M. (1994), "Men of Inde: Renaissance Ethnography and The Tempest", Shakespeare Studies, XXII, pp. 15-44.

Hulme Peter (2000), 'Reading from Elsewhere: George Lamming and the Paradox of Exile' in Hulme and Sherman eds., 'The Tempest' and its Travels' (London: Reaktion Books, pp. 220-35.

Levin, Richard (2001), "Selective Quotations and Selective Marxisms: A Response to Alan Sinfield and David Siar", Early Modern Culture

Loomba, Ania (1999), "Turning point: Fundamentalism and English Studies", Textual Practice 13: 2 (1999), pp. 221-25.

---(1998), Colonialism, Postcolonialism. Londoan and New York, Routledge.

---(1997). "The Long and Saggy Sari" in Women, A Cultural Review (Special issue on Independent India) 8: 3 (Autumn 1997), pp. 278-292.

--- (1994), "The Colour of Patriarchy: Cultural Difference, Critical Differences and Renaissance Drama," in Patricia Parker and Margo Hendricks, eds. Women, Race and Writing in the Early Modern Period, London: Routledge, pp. 17-34.

---(1989) Gender, Race, Renaissance Drama, Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Loomba, Ania and Martin Orkin (1998) eds., Postcolonial Shakespeares, London and New York, Routledge.

Matar, Nabil (1999), Turks, Moors and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery , New York, Columbia University Press.

McDonald, Russ (1991), "Reading The Tempest", Shakespeare Survey, 43, pp. 15-28.

O'Hanlon, Rosalind and David Washbrook (1992) 'After Orientalism, Culture, Criticism, and Politics in the Third World', Comparative Studies in Society and History 34: 1 (January 1992) pp. 141-167.

Siar, David (2001), "'Talking about Pennies' and the Dialectical Challenge: A Response to Alan Sinfield's 'Selective Quotation'", Early Modern Culture, 2, 0-0.

Sinfield, Alan (2001), "Selective Quotation", Early Modern Culture, 2, pp. 1-7.

Skura, Meredith Anne (1989), "Discourse and the Individual: The Case of Colonialism in The Tempest", Shakespeare Quarterly, 40, pp. 42-69.

Sole, Kelwyn (1994), 'Democratising Culture and Literature in a "New South Africa": Organization and Theory', Current Writing 6(2), pp. 1-37.

Stille, Alexander (2002) 'What is America's Place in the World Now?', The New York Times, Saturday, January 12, 2002, pp. A 17, 19.

Takaki, Ronald (2000), 'The "Tempest" in the Wilderness' in from James Phelan and Gerald Graff eds., The Tempest: A Case Study in Critical Controversy, Bedford/ St. Martin's Press, pp. 140-172.


Saturday Apr 08, 2006

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I have blocked, cussed out, or otherwise alienated much of the active members on this site.

oopies blush
xanippi:



Richmond Rites of Passage
Five County Legislators Share Their First-Session Experiences

By Lisa Rein
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, March 16, 2006; Page VA20

House Bill 1002 arrived on the floor of the Virginia House of Delegates, and freshman David L. Englin found himself questioned on what seemed to be a routine measure.

A Republican delegate from Amherst asked the Alexandria Democrat to explain an obscure reference in the bill to the state code. Englin was ready with talking points.


Charles Caputo (D-Fairfax) draws a laugh
Del C. Charles Caputo (D), center, draws a laugh from fellow Fairfax Dels. Kristen J. Amundson (D) and Kenneth R. Plum (D) on the House floor. (Robert A. Reeder -- The Washington Post)
Blog

The Washington Post's Richmond bureau blogs on legislative tidbits, transition speculation and political news nuggets.

"It was a gentle initiation question," recalled Englin, at 31 the youngest Democrat in the legislature. "He was trying to stump me on my own bill." Then the House killed his legislation by a unanimous vote. And within seconds, it was reconsidered and swiftly approved, 87-8.

The House's welcome ritual is a bit of legislative hazing: When a freshman's first bill comes to the floor, on first reading it is summarily killed. "Everyone knows it's going to happen," Englin said. "That doesn't mean you don't get a little nervous."

In their first 60 days as the county's newest state lawmakers, Englin and four others -- all Democrats -- elected in November to the General Assembly have learned some things about legislative life in Richmond. You gain anywhere from five to 15 pounds. You must quickly become an expert on everything from storm-water management to liability coverage for railroads. You miss your spouse and kids. It can be agonizing to be in the minority party. And members of the other party can be great colleagues.

In the House, the freshmen are known as "Four Daves and a Chuck," because they have been lumped with David E. Poisson (D), newly elected to represent the 32nd House District in Loudoun County. He has no Fairfax precincts, but he quickly became one of the gang. The fifth Fairfax Democrat is Mark R. Herring, who joined the Senate after a special election in January.

"We've got a lot of esprit de corps," said Del. C. Charles Caputo, a retired telecommunications executive. The newcomers have gotten to know each other a lot better during the session. They have met about once a week to swap stories over coffee or drinks. They share political philosophies as moderates who reached out to voters on quality-of-life issues rather than the social issues that defined the campaigns of some of their opponents.

Two of the Daves, David L. Bulova and Dave W. Marsden, shared digs, a two-bedroom apartment in a converted tobacco warehouse downtown. Their time there together consisted mostly of watching Jon Stewart on Comedy Central, when they got home in time. It didn't matter that the fridge was empty, because they regularly ingested countless tiny quiches and crab cakes at lobbyist receptions.

"I had this vision we'd get home from work at around 10 o'clock, kick up our heels and talk about important bills," said Bulova, 36, who works as an environmental consultant when he's not lawmaking. "In reality, we get home around 11:30. We barely have enough energy to watch a half-hour of television."

"Dave's turned me on to Jon Stewart," said Marsden, 57. "I'm a little older. I'm attempting to get with it in my dotage." Their wives hit it off quickly when they visited on weekends.

Marsden, who succeeded GOP Del. James H. Dillard II, arrived with the most experience in state government, having served as chief deputy and acting director of the Department of Juvenile Justice. He switched parties when he ran for office, a decision that was a subject of some amusement to Republicans when he accidentally walked into their caucus shortly after the session started.

"They all broke out laughing and invited me to come on in," Marsden recalled. "I said, 'You had your chance!' "

Although some freshmen wait a few years before wading into substantive legislation, choosing instead to submit bills commending local groups or residents, Marsden got several hefty bills through the House and Senate, including one exempting juveniles from confidentiality when they report suspected gang activity to law enforcement officials.

The five men said they're learning to not take it personally when their bills get rolled into others that are similar but have been filed by more senior legislators. Or when they see their bills die before making it out of committee. Caputo's measure to change the state school aid formula to help Fairfax was promptly tabled by a subcommittee.

The freshmen say they're humbled at having to become instant experts on complex subjects before voting on laws that could have profound consequences. And there was that encyclopedia of parliamentary procedure they had to learn.

"It's so easy to forget whether I'm voting on a floor amendment or what the heck I'm voting on," said Bulova, whose previous experience in the public sector was on the board of directors of the Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District.

He admitted to late-night readings of Thomas Jefferson's manual on procedure.

But Bulova had a head start on floor rules over Herring, who wasn't elected until two weeks after the session's start, after William C. Mims (R) resigned to join the state attorney general's office. A lawyer and former Loudoun supervisor, Herring had missed the bill filing deadline and had to get special permission from the Senate to have it extended. "You're sworn in, and one hour later you're on the floor of the Senate!" he said. "It's kind of surreal."

The freshmen know they're not likely to embarrass themselves, because they have generous mentors, formal and informal. Bulova said he was relieved to have veteran Vivian E. Watts (D-Fairfax) at his side in emergencies, calling her a "self-proclaimed wonk." Several House members said they had been awed by Del. Robert G. Marshall (R-Prince William), a master of parliamentary procedure.

Perhaps the biggest frustration, some freshmen said, has been experiencing what it means to be a Democrat in a legislature controlled by Republicans. When both chambers approved a November referendum on a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage, the domination of social issues important to many conservatives was clear, they said.

"It went way beyond what needed to be done," Marsden said of the party-line vote.

The freshmen said they were eager to get home to wives and children they had seen on only some weekends since mid-January. Still, the experience has increased the political sophistication of some of their kids.

Englin said his 6-year-old son, Caleb, recently claimed that he should be treated as a young teenager.

After a disagreement, Englin said, Caleb asked why his dad couldn't legislate him into maturity. "He asked me, 'Why can't you just make that a rule?' " Englin recalled. "I told him I'm down in Richmond making rules for the commonwealth."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/15/AR2006031500828.html

Saturday Apr 08, 2006

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xanippi:

Henry the eight act one scene one
Happy birthday mike Sunday April tenth 2006


ACT I
PROLOGUE
I come no more to make you laugh: things now,
That bear a weighty and a serious brow,
Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe,
Such noble scenes as draw the eye to flow,
We now present. Those that can pity, here
May, if they think it well, let fall a tear;
The subject will deserve it. Such as give
Their money out of hope they may believe,
May here find truth too. Those that come to see
Only a show or two, and so agree
The play may pass, if they be still and willing,
I'll undertake may see away their shilling
Richly in two short hours. Only they
That come to hear a merry bawdy play,
A noise of targets, or to see a fellow
In a long motley coat guarded with yellow,
Will be deceived; for, gentle hearers, know,
To rank our chosen truth with such a show
As fool and fight is, beside forfeiting
Our own brains, and the opinion that we bring,
To make that only true we now intend,
Will leave us never an understanding friend.
Therefore, for goodness' sake, and as you are known
The first and happiest hearers of the town,
Be sad, as we would make ye: think ye see
The very persons of our noble story
As they were living; think you see them great,
And follow'd with the general throng and sweat
Of thousand friends; then in a moment, see
How soon this mightiness meets misery:
And, if you can be merry then, I'll say
A man may weep upon his wedding-day.

SCENE I. London. An ante-chamber in the palace.

Enter NORFOLK at one door; at the other, BUCKINGHAM and ABERGAVENNY
BUCKINGHAM
Good morrow, and well met. How have ye done
Since last we saw in France?

NORFOLK
I thank your grace,
Healthful; and ever since a fresh admirer
Of what I saw there.

BUCKINGHAM
An untimely ague
Stay'd me a prisoner in my chamber when
Those suns of glory, those two lights of men,
Met in the vale of Andren.

NORFOLK
'Twixt Guynes and Arde:
I was then present, saw them salute on horseback;
Beheld them, when they lighted, how they clung
In their embracement, as they grew together;
Which had they, what four throwed ones could have weighed
Such a compounded one?

BUCKINGHAM
All the whole time
I was my chamber's prisoner.

NORFOLK
Then you lost
The view of earthly glory: men might say,
Till this time pomp was single, but now married
To one above itself. Each following day
Became the next day's master, till the last
Made former wonders its. To-day the French,
All clinquant, all in gold, like heathen gods,
Shone down the English; and, to-morrow, they
Made Britain India: every man that stood
Show'd like a mine. Their dwarfish pages were
As cherubins, all guilt: the madams too,
Not used to toil, did almost sweat to bear
The pride upon them, that their very labour
Was to them as a painting: now this masque
Was cried incomparable; and the ensuing night
Made it a fool and beggar. The two kings,
Equal in lustre, were now best, now worst,
As presence did present them; him in eye,
Still him in praise: and, being present both
'Twas said they saw but one; and no discerner
Durst wag his tongue in censure. When these suns--
For so they phrase 'em--by their heralds challenged
The noble spirits to arms, they did perform
Beyond thought's compass; that former fabulous story,
Being now seen possible enough, got credit,
That Bevis was believed.

BUCKINGHAM
O, you go far.

NORFOLK
As I belong to worship and affect
In honour honesty, the tract of every thing
Would by a good discourser lose some life,
Which action's self was tongue to. All was royal;
To the disposing of it nought rebell'd.
Order gave each thing view; the office did
Distinctly his full function.

BUCKINGHAM
Who did guide,
I mean, who set the body and the limbs
Of this great sport together, as you guess?

NORFOLK
One, certes, that promises no element
In such a business.

BUCKINGHAM
I pray you, who, my lord?

NORFOLK
All this was order'd by the good discretion
Of the right reverend Cardinal of York.

BUCKINGHAM
The devil speed him! no man's pie is freed
From his ambitious finger. What had he
To do in these fierce vanities? I wonder
That such a keech can with his very bulk
Take up the rays o' the beneficial sun
And keep it from the earth.

NORFOLK
Surely, sir,
There's in him stuff that puts him to these ends;
For, being not propp'd by ancestry, whose grace
Chalks successors their way, nor call'd upon
For high feats done to the crown; neither allied
For eminent assistants; but, spider-like,
Out of his self-drawing web, he gives us note,
The force of his own merit makes his way
A gift that heaven gives for him, which buys
A place next to the king.

ABERGAVENNY
I cannot tell
What heaven hath given him,--let some graver eye
Pierce into that; but I can see his pride
Peep through each part of him: whence has he that,
If not from hell? the devil is a niggard,
Or has given all before, and he begins
A new hell in himself.

BUCKINGHAM
Why the devil,
Upon this French going out, took he upon him,
Without the privity o' the king, to appoint
Who should attend on him? He makes up the file
Of all the gentry; for the most part such
To whom as great a charge as little honour
He meant to lay upon: and his own letter,
The honourable board of council out,
Must fetch him in the papers.

ABERGAVENNY
I do know
Kinsmen of mine, three at the least, that have
By this so sickened their estates, that never
They shall abound as formerly.

BUCKINGHAM
O, many
Have broke their backs with laying manors on 'em
For this great journey. What did this vanity
But minister communication of
A most poor issue?

NORFOLK
Grievingly I think,
The peace between the French and us not values
The cost that did conclude it.

BUCKINGHAM
Every man,
After the hideous storm that follow'd, was
A thing inspired; and, not consulting, broke
Into a general prophecy; That this tempest,
Dashing the garment of this peace, aboded
The sudden breach on't.

NORFOLK
Which is budded out;
For France hath flaw'd the league, and hath attach'd
Our merchants' goods at Bourdeaux.

ABERGAVENNY
Is it therefore
The ambassador is silenced?

NORFOLK
Marry, is't.

ABERGAVENNY
A proper title of a peace; and purchased
At a superfluous rate!

BUCKINGHAM
Why, all this business
Our reverend cardinal carried.

NORFOLK
Like it your grace,
The state takes notice of the private difference
Betwixt you and the cardinal. I advise you--
And take it from a heart that wishes towards you
Honour and plenteous safety--that you read
The cardinal's malice and his potency
Together; to consider further that
What his high hatred would effect wants not
A minister in his power. You know his nature,
That he's revengeful, and I know his sword
Hath a sharp edge: it's long and, 't may be said,
It reeeeeeeaches faaaaaaaaaaaar, and where 'twill not extend,
Thither he darts it. Bosom up my counsel,
You'll find it wholesome. Lo, where comes that rock
That I advise your shunning.




Enter CARDINAL WOLSEY, the purse borne before him, certain of the Guard, and two Secretaries with papers. CARDINAL WOLSEY in his passage fixeth his eye on BUCKINGHAM, and BUCKINGHAM on him, both full of disdain


(VERY angry)
CARDINAL WOLSEY
The Duke of Buckingham's surveyor, ha?
Where's his examination?

(points to buckingham)
First Secretary
Here, so please you.
-
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Is he in person ready ?

First Secretary
Ay, please your grace.

CARDINAL WOLSEY
Well, we shall then know more; and Buckingham
Shall lessen this big look.

Exeunt CARDINAL WOLSEY and his Train

BUCKINGHAM
This butcher's cur is venom-mouth'd, and I
Have not the power to muzzle him; therefore best
Not wake him in his slumber. A beggar's book
Outworths a noble's blood.

NORFOLK
What, are you chafed?
Ask God for temperance; that's the appliance only
Which your disease requires.

BUCKINGHAM
I read in's looks
Matter against me; and his eye reviled
Me, as his abject object: at this instant
He bores me with some trick: he's gone to the king;
I'll follow and outstare him.

NORFOLK
Stay, my lord,
And let your reason with your choler question
What 'tis you go about: to climb steep hills
Requires slow pace at first: anger is like
A full-hot horse, who being allow'd his way,
Self-mettle tires him. Not a man in England
Can advise me like you: be to yourself
As you would to your friend.

BUCKINGHAM
I'll to the king;
And from a mouth of honour quite cry down
This Ipswich fellow's insolence; or proclaim
There's difference in no persons.

NORFOLK
Be advised;
Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself: we may outrun,
By violent swiftness, that which we run at,
And lose by over-running. Know you not,
The fire that mounts the liquor til run o'er,
In seeming to augment it wastes it? Be advised:
I say again, there is no English soul
More stronger to direct you than yourself,
If with the sap of reason you would quench,
Or but allay, the fire of passion.

BUCKINGHAM
Sir,
I am thankful to you; and I'll go along
By your prescription: but this top-proud fellow,
Whom from the flow of gall I name not but
From sincere motions, by intelligence,
And proofs as clear as founts in July when
We see each grain of gravel, I do know
To be corrupt and treasonous.

NORFOLK
Say not 'treasonous.'

BUCKINGHAM
To the king I'll say't; and make my vouch as strong
As shore of rock. Attend. This holy fox,
Or wolf, or both,--for he is equal ravenous
As he is subtle, and as prone to mischief
As able to perform't; his mind and place
Infecting one another, yea, reciprocally--
Only to show his pomp as well in France
As here at home, suggests the king our master
To this last costly treaty, the interview,
That swallow'd so much treasure, and like a glass
Did break i' the rinsing.

NORFOLK
Faith, and so it did.

BUCKINGHAM
Pray, give me favour, sir. This cunning cardinal
The articles o' the combination drew
As himself pleased; and they were ratified
As he cried 'Thus let be': to as much end
As give a crutch to the dead: but our count-cardinal
Has done this, and 'tis well; for worthy Wolsey,
Who cannot err, he did it. Now this follows,--
Which, as I take it, is a kind of puppy
To the old dam, treason,--Charles the emperor,
Under pretence to see the queen his aunt--
For 'twas indeed his colour, but he came
To whisper Wolsey,--here makes visitation:
His fears were, that the interview betwixt
England and France might, through their amity,
Breed him some prejudice; for from this league
Peep'd harms that menaced him: he privily
Deals with our cardinal; and, as I trow,--
Which I do well; for I am sure the emperor
Paid ere he promised; whereby his suit was granted
Ere it was ask'd; but when the way was made,
And paved with gold, the emperor thus desired,
That he would please to alter the king's course,
And break the foresaid peace. Let the king know,
As soon he shall by me, that thus the cardinal
Does buy and sell his honour as he pleases,
And for his own advantage.

NORFOLK
I am sorry
To hear this of him; and could wish he were
Something mistaken in't.

BUCKINGHAM
No, not a syllable:
I do pronounce him in that very shape
He shall appear in proof.

Enter BRANDON, a Sergeant-at-arms before him, and two or three of the Guard

BRANDON
Your office, sergeant; execute it.

Sergeant
Sir,
My lord the Duke of Buckingham, and Earl
Of Hereford, Stafford, and Northampton, I
Arrest thee of high treason, in the name
Of our most sovereign king.

BUCKINGHAM
Lo, you, my lord,
The net has fall'n upon me! I shall perish
Under device and practise.

BRANDON
I am sorry
To see you ta'en from liberty, to look on
The business present: 'tis his highness' pleasure
You shall to the Tower.

BUCKINGHAM
It will help me nothing
To plead mine innocence; for that dye is on me
Which makes my whitest part black. The will of heaven
Be done in this and all things! I obey.
O my Lord Abergavenny, fare you well!

BRANDON
Nay, he must bear you company. The king

To ABERGAVENNY

Is pleased you shall to the Tower, till you know
How he determines further.

ABERGAVENNY
As the duke said,
The will of heaven be done, and the king's pleasure
By me obey'd!

BRANDON
Here is a warrant from
The king to attach Lord Montacute; and the bodies
Of the duke's confessor, John de la Car,
One Gilbert Peck, his chancellor--

BUCKINGHAM
So, so;
These are the limbs o' the plot: no more, I hope.

BRANDON
A monk o' the Chartreux.

BUCKINGHAM
O, Nicholas Hopkins?

BRANDON
He.

BUCKINGHAM
My surveyor is false; the o'er-great cardinal
Hath show'd him gold; my life is spann'd already:
I am the shadow of poor Buckingham,
Whose figure even this instant cloud puts on,
By darkening my clear sun. My lord, farewell.

Exeunt

skutch:

It's interesting how very much one derelict building can look like many others. blackeyed